The State of Æscir

Mind Matters - how thought becomes reality           
   Allen, Speaker  ÷   September 1993; June 5 2002
          
          

                      Request Printed Copies of This Item

to the seekers

Originally published September 1993: ISBN 1-884318-00-2

Copyright © 1993-2001 by ASC Missions Group, ntc.

Notice: Full Revision
future availability

We currently have no plans for this WWW Revision be taken further, although now and then critical changes are made in the Fundamentals and Selected Axioms sections, to keep them current with continuing research results. Additionally, we are continuing the work of expanding our materials to increase their usefulness. A set of larger works with much greater detail and discussion is being prepared. In the meantime, don't miss the book's newer companion articles, Lucidity, A Spiritual Calculus, and wHEN pOSITIVE tHINKING fAILS, which, like Mind Matters, and other ASC essays, can also be accessed by way of the ASC Missions Group, ntc. / ASC BlueFlame Impressions, ntc., web pages.

Note:
pages numbers from the original book are inserted where they occurred
formatted as -N-
where N is the number of the original page.

Table of Contents

Non-indoctrination Policy - HelpNotes for Readers
Foreword - Introduction
An Example Case
Manifestational Chaos Theory - The Doctrine of Acceptance
The Fundamentals - Selected Axioms
Credo - Acceptance Services Center - The Author
Index

Non-indoctrination Policy

Free will, and the unquestioned right of every individual to make personal choices, without duress from anyone, are to be respected absolutely and honored above all purposes whatsoever, whether a particular choice is fully informed or not.

--by order of the Speaker

(table of contents)

HelpNotes for Readers

1/4 - Study Advice

If, in reading or studying this material, you find the going difficult or frustrating, an important reason could be that you have gone past something you did not fully understand. The most common misunderstandings are caused by misunderstood or not-understood words.

Each part of this material builds upon what went before; everything after a misunderstanding will be affected by it. Therefore, if you experience frustration or a feeling of alienation from any aspect of this material, including its author or general subject, you should back up to the last place you felt good about it and then search forward for a misunderstanding. If you find one, whether word or phrase, clear it up before continuing.

2/4 - Formatting in the Fundamentals section

Each fundamental is in bold type.
Definitions are
formatted as broken sentences, with the defined word on the first line and the definition text indented on the next line(s).
Comments are in plain text and are not indented.

3/4 - Using the index

The index at the end of this document is set up much the same as the index in the actual book, with two exceptions. In the original, the number of the page where a term's definition occurs is in italics; in this document the definition's page number is a link to that page or to the page upon which the applicable Fundamental begins.

The second exception is that definitions and corresponding index entries have been added since the publication of the first edition. Although these were not there to have page numbers (or were, but weren't included in the index), they are listed in the index By page number "as though" they were there all the time.

You can use this feature to look up Acceptance terms quickly, without having to know where in the document they are defined.

You will also find that each Fundamental's section ends with two links. The first returns you to the Fundamentals subject listing; the second takes you to the Index.

You can use this feature to work with or study single Fundamentals and the terms included within the section covering each.

4/4 - More on Page Numbers

The reader who pays attention to the inserted original page numbers will notice that they have been reversed in two instances. This is due to the re-sequencing of Fundamentals 12 and 13 (pages 44-45), and of Fundamentals 26 and 27 (pages 60-61).

(table of contents)

-1-

Foreword

When I was about seven years old, I had a particularly striking paranormal experience, one of prescience, a brief moment that seemed to last forever. During it I knew everything that was about to happen. It ended when I tried to act on that knowledge.

This was neither the first nor the last paranormal experience for me, but it was the first one that moved me so much that I talked with someone else about it. I found out at that time that I am not alone in a world that lies beyond the everyday playground of life.

The person with whom I spoke was my father. He told me several things in response to my story. He didn't know what that particular -2- type of experience was called, but he had heard of it and others.

He told me about a boy with whom he went to grade school. This boy had insisted since he learned to talk that he had been someone else before and that he had been killed in a hunting accident alone in a place no one would know to look for him. He had a strong need to let his wife know that he was okay. After years of trying to deal with the boy's "fantasy" in the usual ways, his father, in trying to settle the matter, actually helped him to confirm it, much to everyone's surprise.

Another thing my father told me was, "Don't talk to just anybody about this. People will throw rocks at you."

I was impressed. So, others do this stuff, too, I thought. I'd like to find them. But I also respected my father's judgment, so I kept quiet for several years.

My father died two years after our conversation, and another three years after that my mother decided to move to another state. We six children were a bit much for the financial -3- situation, so I, being the oldest at twelve, was sent to live with my father's sister and her daughters.

One Sunday, over family dinner, one of the boyfriends brought up a story he had heard about, of some psychic incident someone had. The conversation turned to deja-vu incidents, those of the feeling that one has "been here before". I felt safe with my father's relatives, so I chimed in with my story. I added a few more when I discovered they were interested.

I noticed that my aunt was perturbed. "So, it's you!" she scowled at me. The rest of us wanted to know what she meant by that, and she told us about her single paranormal experience, one of clairvoyance that she had shared with her mother at the instant of her brother's death during World War II. At the time, some thought she might be "the one".

It seems that these abilities were strong in my father's family, especially in the women. And in each generation, there might be one who was exceptionally gifted. But they were not always considered lucky. Because of certain things that had happened to some of -4- them in the colonial years of our country, the family had moved more than once to remote areas in search of peace. And the abilities were seen as a curse.

Years later I put my aunt's story and my father's warning together, and I finally understood the warning.

There is something else in my family tree that may have contributed to the intensity of my manifestation of "the curse". My mother's mother was an American native, a Blackfoot Indian. The Blackfoot are a very spiritual people in their native state. Something may have come from that, although none of my mother's immediate family showed any of it. Nevertheless, it was there in the lore and the environment. We lived in Montana, where living from the land is right action and General Custer was a bad guy.

Yet another contributing factor may be found in my having gotten my skull fractured as a young child. I was hit hard with a large rock thrown down a hill at me. In a strange way, I remember it vividly.

-5- My body felt instantly electrocuted and then went completely numb. I stayed alert, although I felt fuzzy. I realized that my body was going to fall on its face and probably hurt itself even more, so I lifted its right leg up and over a short wall next to me and sat it down. I leaned forward on my hands and waited for things to normalize.

I was no longer "in" my head. I didn't feel like I was distinct from it either. It was more like I was "big" and my body was a marionette suspended within this greater me.

After a moment my brother came to my aid and helped me walk over to where my father and uncle were working. They took me to the doctor and had my head x-rayed.

I went home to wait to see if my concussion got worse. It didn't, I think, and I recovered quickly. I say I think because I'm not sure I would have known if things had gotten worse. In my state, my body could have been dead and I might not have noticed. It certainly was unconscious for a while, but I moved it around anyway. Everyone thought I was just a tough little kid. I never told them that I -6- was literally knocked "out". But I've been out ever since.

After that story, it should come as no surprise that I do not see the brain as the source or even the seat of consciousness. In fact, I believe the opposite: the brain is a result of consciousness, just like everything else.

The point of all this self-exposure is that some things happened to me that needed explanations. How could I make my body move when I was not in it and it was unconscious? How could my aunt and grandmother, themselves hundreds of miles apart, "see" my uncle die in the Philippines? How could I know what was going to happen later? Why did I have dreams that revealed probable futures?

I've heard it said that each of us has a virtual question. This is a question that underlies and sums up our entire slant on life. If we do, mine is, What does it all mean? I set out to find out. And that set the tone of my life for many years.

Then during a series of events in 1986 I found out. I discovered my eternal existence and -7- who I really am. I had a particularly intense afternoon of losing myself into the environment while contemplating the nature and flight of an Osprey (a large hawk) that I was watching fish for salmon in the Klamath River. And I began to see, spontaneously and through synchronicity, what I had always known but never truly realized. As time has passed since then, the view has only gotten better.

I decided that I had to make it one of my missions in life to articulate what I had found. I knew from my studies that others had tried but none had really succeeded: no simple path to enlightenment yet existed. I know, some of you will disagree, but I know of whom you think, and still I say, None.

I don't mean to minimize anyone. I believe that my predecessors merely suffered limitations on their abilities to fully express their discoveries. But I have a facility with the language which, when combined with the experiential background of an unsettled seeker, can be stretched to the task. And I have built on the earlier work of others too numerous to name. At any rate, I had to try, if only -8- because to succeed in this expression is fundamental to my greater mission.

In the course of counseling and coaching others, I gradually developed a set of basic rules that describe what is going on with us. They are very metaphysical, but they are much more than just pretty ideas. When applied in personal counseling and business consulting they point to miraculous improvements. Established businesses double and triple, and those with long-standing cultural or political problems quickly stabilize. And individuals, who only resist having problems because to have them is an unnatural state to begin with, find themselves so completely free of those problems that they don't even remember having had them!

And so I developed Manifestational Chaos Theory and Acceptance. Both are overviewed in later sections of this booklet.

There are already several implementations of Acceptance. For example, there is Articulate Management, our mission to the business community. It is a business consulting firm that approaches top executives from the -9- position that a business is a direct reflection of its leadership's thinking. If you want to change a business, you must change that thinking. What makes our approach different is that we don't change the thinking at the top by replacing the thinker. We assist the existing leader to make the changes itself.

We have counseling and training that people have used and are using to completely revamp their lives, on their own terms. And more of them are discovering us every day.

Acceptance has already changed the world-views and improved the lives of many people. I trust it will do the same for you.

Allen, Speaker for Acceptance
September 1993
Mountain View, California
(table of contents)

-11-

Introduction

The fundamentals were developed in the course of a quest for a better understanding of life that was largely motivated by the author's desire to find a method for repairing unhappy lives. Even as a child he saw a world seemingly doomed to misery, and he wanted it different. He also saw a world of possibility, and he wanted that one real. What he needed were the makings of a transition. What he came up with is Acceptance.

The counseling and advice that are based on the fundamentals are extremely effective. This is a testimonial to the power of the fundamentals and the applicability of their expression. But when one sits down with them in isolation, distinct from their direct -12- implementation, they can feel a bit dense each seemingly laden with significance and yet almost trite. As to the triteness, we remind the reader that simple statements were the objective. As to the weightiness, well, this is a deep subject.

The fictionalized example case in the following section is presented to set the stage for the reader. It describes a life gone awry, how that happened, and what would repair it.

After a brief discussion of their supporting philosophy, the Fundamentals are then presented in the format of a reference listing. Each can be contemplated in terms of how it operates within the fictionalized case study and in our personal lives.

A bigger and more detailed book is in the works for those of you who will want deeper discussion. However, it is not intended to be a replacement for this volume. This one is for quick reference, meditation and convenience.

In summary, this booklet introduces the basics of a new world-view, Acceptance. It is intended to be an overview rather than an -13- in-depth study. Therefore, it does not go into the detail some readers may desire. It does, however, give a complete statement of the Acceptance Fundamentals. Certain supplemental information has also been included.

The best way to use this booklet is to study it a section at a time, seeking first to clarify what the statements mean and then contemplating the deeper meaning for some time. Also, you should ask yourself often, How can I apply this? or, How does this apply to me?

Covering just one or two Fundamentals a day is one path to a strong understanding. Each builds on the one before, so it is good to invest enough time with each expression to ensure that you get it well enough to go on.

Of course, none of this means that you should not skim through this booklet right away, or review it often. Go ahead and get an overview first, if you like. Cycle through it as you study; you will find more each time through. And re-read it often. Just try to avoid going past things that you don't understand. There is no need to make your quest for a better -14- understanding any more difficult than it may already have been.

Certain other cautions are in order.

No assumptions of similarity between Acceptance and anything else should go unquestioned. While some of it may resemble other things, it is definitely different from everything else. But we do not spend much effort on saying what Acceptance is not. In most instances, assume that if a concept is not referenced it is not included. Notable exclusions are linear time-dependent concepts such as karma and evolution.

The wordings used to express the Fundamentals were chosen for accuracy of statement rather than simple reading. You may be comforted in knowing that no one has ever studied them without making reasonable use of a good dictionary. (The Speaker faced that challenge while codifying them!) But then, this is serious information, the accurate expression of which has always been the major stumbling block to its becoming available. It is worth the effort.

-15- Finally, what should you do if you run into disagreements? Well, you could trash the book. Or, you could turn those moments of dissonance into opportunities. We suggest a three-step approach. Notice that none of them asks you to compromise.

The first step is simply to make sure you know what is being said. Maybe the author's choice of words or sentence structure doesn't work easily for you. Check.

Next, if you still disagree, ask yourself the Magic Question: If not this, then what? You may surprise yourself.

Finally, use the moment to ensure that you are keeping your thoughts and beliefs consistent within themselves. If the most you get out of this book is a little self-reorganization, that will have been a lot.

(table of contents)

-17-

An Example Case

After shopping all afternoon, she is now anxious to get home. Just as she steps out through the baker's door someone shouts, "Look out!" She begins to turn, but the warning has come too late. A skater hits the door and it slams against her face. Dizzied, and shocked by the pain, she falls sprawled into a planter like a neglected rag doll.

This event violates several of her standards for how things should be, and she resists every one of them: she should not hurt; she should not lie about in an undignified position; nasty surprises should not happen; one should be able to walk out a door safely; she should be able to handle it; life is supposed to -18- be fun; the world is supposed to be friendly; and, be careful!

Each of these violations becomes a mental object of resistance, an element she wishes to avoid hidden in a memory she is not willing to re-experience. Henceforth, she will strive to prevent these things from happening, but not think why. An unnoticed agenda develops.

In the mind, however, to conceive an event is to experience it. And these are things she wishes to avoid experiencing. She gets caught up in a paradox: she is unwilling to confront them, but she must remember these things to keep them on the must-avoid list. So her attachment to the event and its elements becomes unconsciously automatic.

Without correction, this continues forever.

Think of the mind as a formless volume of holographic mist. Every event she has ever experienced, every imagining she has ever had, every place she has been, every person she has known, every thought she has had, and more all are represented there, in full-motion video-like realism. All it takes to -19- replay any of it is to put attention on it. Incidentally or purposefully, it makes no difference. And attention flies to things very quickly, faster than thought itself.

Everything in the mind is very elaborately (and often improbably) cross-referenced. So attention, flowing through the most intricate and often illogical connections imaginable, can wind up in some wildly surprising places compared to what is actually going on.

In resisting the event, she is also denying it, trying to avoid the experience. But to conceive is to experience, so even if the physical event is not happening in the present moment, the memory version may be playing constantly. It, and every even slightly similar memory and object of resistance even remotely connected to it.

She comes home from the hospital with a mild concussion, a dull headache, and some bandaged ribs. And she is in a rage against her father. It doesn't make sense, she knows, but he should have been there, to protect and save her. After all, he was a baker himself, wasn't he? But he wasn't there.

-20- The times he was there and did help her don't matter. The pack of stuff from the times he wasn't and didn't is vested with the intensity of its own multi-element ration of resistance, and now, compounded into this event, it makes the entire subject dark and unconfrontable. In fact, she doesn't even remember the moment of impact. Her version of the event is that she must have been knocked unconscious.

Shopping is not the same the next time she goes out. She just gets what she needs and goes home. As time goes by, she exhibits a tendency to forget bakery goods. When she has to go back out to get them, she settles for some other store. But there is always a good reason. And always some discomfort lurking unnoticed in the background.

Like everyone else, she has been going through life defining things for herself, and sometimes getting things wrong. There's bad information, plain and simple; assumptions made in error; and, old garbage, invisibly inserting itself into the thoughts she has about everything. The older she gets the more this happens, until finally so much of -21- her attention is consumed from moment to moment by the background that she doesn't have enough left for day-to-day living.

She becomes set in her ways and concrete in her thinking a creature of habit. And the joy of life is not just missing, its absence isn't even noticed. Life has become routine, the people in her life neglect her in small ways even while trying to attend to her, and she's not surprised by any of it. After all, it fits her experience of life perfectly.

This situation is not terminal, however, nor even permanent. All she needs is to discover those old objects of resistance, and they will lose their power. The connections will discharge, and she and her life will recover.

She needs to change her thinking.

How? By learning and applying Acceptance. And by consulting a skilled practitioner, preferably one who knows, understands and uses the Fundamentals.

(table of contents)

-23-

Manifestational Chaos Theory

Chaos: bad, good or indifferent?

Most people today think of chaos as just another word for confusion, and they have strong aversions to confusion. Thus to them, chaos seems bad.

However, there is a subtle difference between chaos and confusion. Confusion suggests a situation where things are jumbled together so that it is difficult to discriminate between the different elements in the mix. Confusion is also a state of mind.

Chaos, in its common usage, implies a complete and irremediable lack of organization.

-24- So we can say that a confusion can be fixed while chaos is an entity unto itself. And while it is true that chaos is often thought of as disorder, it has a larger meaning.

The word chaos originally meant an abyss or chasm. Nothingness. But the ancients knew, and now the most modern scientists know, that nothingness is an illusion. Therefore, definition #1 in our dictionary (Webster's New World Dictionary, Third College Edition) is, the disorder of formless matter and infinite space, supposed to have existed before the ordered universe.

The idea of an ordered universe is now called Newtonian, and the physics of order and mechanics are called Newtonian physics, after Sir Isaac Newton, who described the universe in terms of a huge clockwork. In Newton's world, anything can be reduced to laws, as of motion, and everything can ultimately be predicted.

Then came relativity, followed closely by quantum physics, and the Newtonian model was overturned. A good book on this is Gary Zukav's The Dancing Wu Li Masters.

-25- Another book, one that traces yet another big step in the transformation of science, is James Gleick's Chaos. Gleick does a wonderful job of explaining chaos theory. Basically, it is the idea that there are implicit orders hidden throughout disorder. The theory is that apparent order manifests as patterns caused by or oriented to "attractors".

Chaos theory leaves one with the impression that there must be, after all, a grand design, but one so subtle that it must be observed mathematically or deduced from recurring patterns at different scales, as in the twist of a conch shell and the spiral of a galaxy. It is at this point that scientists begin to seriously speculate on the probability of a deity.

Flowing inevitably from chaos theory is the idea that not only are all things possible, all things happen. The question is only where and when. But what if the explicit order, which we experience as solid reality, is a total illusion? Then maybe space and time, as parts of that illusion, do not exist either.

This means that everything exists in some implied form, all the time and everywhere. -26 The name given to this view of things is The Holographic Paradigm (Marilyn Ferguson). A very good book explaining this view is Michael Talbot's The Holographic Universe.

How can all this be described to those of us who have spent all our lives believing in the physical universe? One way is by taking the ladder-steps up through the states of matter.

Begin with solid matter. Heat it up and it will become a liquid and then a gas. But in these levels you are still dealing with matter that retains its atomic identity. Cool a gas, and you always get the liquid state and then the solid state of that same element.

But at energy levels above gas, the atoms come apart and form a cloud of ions. We call this the plasma state. This is where things get a little weird.

What's above the plasma state? The best modern science has given us on this is ylem, or "primordial stuff". And ylem is not physical. You could say that it is just an idea. And that is where science meets philosophy -27- and puts metaphysics in everyone's face. Ironically, that is also where science began.

Hundreds of years ago, alchemists pondered the nature of reality and the states of the physical universe and came up with ideas that are only now being reconsidered. One is that there is no such thing as nothing. Space is not empty, physicists now say. It is filled with potentials that wink in and out of existence at different rates and for different durations.

The ancients, too, said that space was not empty. They said it was composed of (not filled with, there is a difference) a not-yet substance called the AEther. They also said that everything is called from the AEther by the Word of God. And they believed that, since they were created in the image of God, they could, through piety and faith, issue some degree of the Word and bring forth a measure of that which they desired.

This perspective survived into the nineteenth century in the form of a religious perspective known as Deism. Deism is the belief that the Creator put the universe into motion, but -28- rather than remaining separate from it, actually became it, remaining hidden in the background and operating as natural law. This law, it was believed, could be discerned by the minds of people who cared to look for it. Many of the founders of the United States were deists, including Benjamin Franklin and George Washington.

Manifestational Chaos Theory extends all this. It says that everything exists all the time and that our minds are the "attractors" that establish the patterns we experience.

Thus it follows that to direct our destinies we must gain understanding and direction over how the attraction happens. This includes education and application. We need to know how it works so we can use it, and we need to know how to use it to be successful with it. It also includes counsel, because we need to undo our bad thought-habits and remove ourselves from the errors they lead us into and the consequences they pin to us.

All of which moves us from the theory to the philosophy of life based on it.

(table of contents)

-29-

The Doctrine of Acceptance

We understand that all individuals are always creating or co-creating their own and mutual experiences. People need only clarify just what they are actually doing, and realize the mechanics of how they are doing it, to manifest increasingly conscious direction over the fulfillment of their lives and destinies.

All potentials are innate in chaos, and chaos is innate in all potentials. We recognize the need to take that into account. Nothing is what it seems, and everything is far more than that.

The idea is not so much that the individual has the ability to create through ideas projected into a universal consciousness. That would be duality. Duality separates the -30- individual from the whole and leaves it undefined and diminished.

Actually, the individual is a functioning aspect of the universal intelligence and therefore creates merely by attending to an idea. The idea does not "go" somewhere to be formed and then "come back" as a manifestation "into" the individual's experience. It exists eternally in the Æthereal here-and-now and instantly in the experience of the individual, within its own context.

No effort or concentration is required. Nor is the act of creation selective. All thoughts are real; each one manifests in one dimension or another. The only real complication is that most of us are unaware of the extreme subtlety of our thoughts, and thus, our creativity.

_____

We named this world-view Acceptance because it is about dealing with things as they are. Note that we say "deal with" rather than "put up with".

The journey of a thousand miles does not begin with the first step. It begins earlier, -31- with knowing where you are and in which direction you should proceed. Acceptance is a philosophy that assists the user to do just that, on any scale.

Acceptance is the result of a unique combination of resources. These include the Speaker's lifetime of research and development involving philosophy, applied linguistics, political science, comparative religion and human behavior.

The bulk of the work has centered on achieving an accurate expression within the context of what is already generally known, without losing the flavor of the essential differences that stem from newer developments. To accomplish this, certain common words and phrases have been avoided, and some uncommon (but real) words have been employed.

_____

The Acceptance method is to teach truth as best it can be expressed and understood, and to assist the individual to access internally conflicted ideation and attachments, and to clarify their relative values.

-32- For those who may wonder, Acceptance is compatible with the essential scriptures of several major religions, ancient alchemy, the literature of modern science, and the writings of many metaphysicians.

Acceptance is not compatible with literal fundamentalism of any kind, behavioral psychology, any form of Darwinism, or biocentric existentialism.

_____

Know yourself: Self-knowledge is the greatest service to humanity.

(table of contents)

-33-

The Fundamentals

Subject Listing
The source of Life  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  1  2  3  4

What we are . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6 7

How things work . . . . 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

What goes wrong . 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

How to fix it . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 27

(table of contents)

-33-

-{ 1 }-

ACCEPTANCE is
appreciation without significance.

Appreciation is
willingness to experience things as-is.
Significance is
interpretation, or added-on meaning.
Truth is
the unaltered idea, form and intent.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-34-

-{ 2 }-

In Acceptance, the essence of all existence is called the AEther.

The AEther is
the boundless, amorphous and all-encompassing self-aware "primordial stuff" of all things, space, time, consciousness and ideation.
Space is
a perspective based on the concepts of dimension, location and distance.
Time is
a perspective based on the concepts of persistence, sequence and logical progression.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-35-

-{ 3 }-

The AEther is generally aware.

Awareness is
the capacity to comprehend and align perceptions.
Perception is
(a) self-referenced non-local direct knowing;
(b) interpretation of knowledge via metaphor;
(c) the illusion of information being received via the senses from "out there".
Metaphor is
a symbology that is senior to language.
Discernment is
the ability to differentiate perceptions.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-36-

-{ 4 }-

The AEther's solution to the unchanging nature of the eternal here-and-now is to individuate.

Individuation is
the AEther selecting and assuming a point of view and manifesting as a personality.
The decision is to experience variable awareness from localized perspectives -- to see things from limited points of view.

The purpose of life is:
Mystery -> Discovery -> Surprise -> Delight
The activity of living is
the pursuit of self-knowledge through the identification of mysteries,
the quest to discover truth, and
the celebration of enlightenment and accomplishment.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-37-

-{ 5 }-

An individual is
a viewpoint-specific concentration of consciousness within the AEther.

Viewpoint is
approach: attitude and altitude.
Attitude is
one's slant with respect to something, whether toward, away, indirect, or indifferent, etc.
Altitude is
how one positions oneself with respect to something else, as in being superior, inferior, authoritative, or subordinate, etc.
Perspective is
a combination of viewpoint and personality.
Personality is
the behavioral presentation of an individual.
A persona is
AEther being an individual by way of selecting and assuming a viewpoint and personality, through which to express and experience a perspective.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-38-

-{ 6 }-

The individual is specifically aware.

Intuition is
(a) direct knowing;
(b) the quantum leap of understanding that occurs when enough information has been accumulated to adequately direct unencumbered attention toward truth.
Talent is
uninhibited natural ability.
Skill is
trained talent.
Intelligence is
the ability to accurately discern cause and to design appropriate resolutions.
Destiny is
those activities and positions a given individual seems best suited to pursue by reason of personal endowment and inclination.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-39-

-{ 7 }-

Each individual manifests a uniquely combined endowment of the primary AEthereal capacities.

The Prime Paradigm is:
Consciousness+Volition+Intention
A paradigm is
a conceptualized format that is superior to a construct, model, or example.
Consciousness is
self-referencing awareness; vision, thought, perspective, and experience.
Volition is
the power of decision and naming; will, choice, and purposefulness.
Intention is
the projection of self into objectivity.
Purpose is
the objective of an intention.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-40-

-{ 8 }-

The process of actualization is:
Ideation -> Form+Intensity -> Manifestation

Actualization is
the means of "creation".
An idea is
a concept being imaged.
A form is
an image in action "within" the AEther;
the patterning concept to which a manifestation coalesces.
Intensity is
a variable scale of significance.
A manifestation is
the experiential actualization of a form.
Personalities, situations and things, whether objective or subjective, are manifestations.

An environment is
the manifestation of a consensus.
An actualization can be co-caused (by more than one individual).

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-41-

-{ 9 }-

Attention is the creative catalyst.

A catalyst is
an external element that facilitates a result.
Attention is
consciousness directed toward an idea, form or manifestation.
Manifestation is dependent upon attention:
     one is actualizing those forms upon which one has attention, whether or not the attention is conscious;
     no actualization occurs in the absence of attention.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-42-

-{ 10 }-

Manifestation is accomplished by selecting probabilities from a range of possibilities, thus "creating" them.

Selection is
the process of differentiating potential manifestations by putting attention on particular forms, consciously or otherwise.
Creativity is
the ability to intentionally assemble locally unprecedented configurations
and to spontaneously recognize unexpected possibilities.
All possibilities coexist in potentia throughout the AEther; "creation" is therefore an illusion.

Chaos is
the infinite spectra of all dimensions, realities and possibilities, whether potential or manifest.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-43-

-{ 11 }-

Ongoing manifestation is accomplished through repetitive selection, set into play by fixating one's attention.

The cycle of manifestation is:
Selection -> [Reselection(n)] -> Deselection
Selection introduces "order".
Order is
an apparency of relationship in space and/or time.
Autoselection is
the process of anonymous actualization, accomplished through unmonitored, and often repetitive, selection (reselection(n)).
Randomness is
the ratio of autoselection to conscious actualization in a given situation.
Deselection is
the removal or redirection of attention from a form.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-45-

-{ 12 }-

All actualization is affirmative.

Since actualization is a consequence of selection, an actualization is always the affirmative demonstration of a selection.

Destruction is
deselection, either through neglect followed by environmental autoselection or through personal autoselection of an alternative form.
Unpredictability
is the function of consensual "background" selections becoming randomly predominant.
Good and bad, etc.,
are merely opinions as to whether or not a particular state of affairs in a transformative situation is consistent with an observer's standards.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-44-

-{ 13 }-

The individual devises and asserts standards and assigns values for experiences.

Resonance is
the individual's response to the degree of consistency between a particular state of affairs and the individual's standards.
Harmony and dissonance are opposing degrees of resonance.

Harmony is
the perceptual metaphor for the mid-range between inadequate and excessive randomness.
Dissonance is
the perceptual metaphor for both inadequate and excessive randomness.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-46-

-{ 14 }-

The tolerable / desirable middle range between complete predictability and full randomness is defined by the individual's standards.

Pain is
a variable emotional response to experiencing excessive randomness.
Pleasure is
a variable emotional response to experiencing optimal randomness levels.
Boredom is
a variable emotional response to experiencing inadequate or absent randomness.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-47-

-{ 15 }-

The individual experiences resonance through a perceptual metaphor known as emotion.

Emotion is
the individual's interpretation of the resonant harmony or dissonance between the experience at hand and the individual's standards as to what can be comfortably experienced or as to how an event can be, should be, must be, should not be or must not be experienced.
Happiness is
the experiential metaphor for perceiving one's standards being affirmed or gratified.
Upset is
the experiential metaphor for perceiving one's standards being refuted or violated.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-48-

-{ 16 }-

The structure of trauma is:
Idealism + Frustration = Disillusionment

Idealism is
a condition of innocent confidence within which ideas are pure and defined only in terms of the Prime Paradigm.
Frustration is
the experiential metaphor for perceiving and resisting volition being impaired.
Disillusionment is
the condition of concession to a failure-degraded self-image, resulting from having had an ideal become altered by the attachment and coloration of frustration.
A blunted intention is
one whose ideal has been lost to frustration.
-49-
A failed purpose is
an ideal that has been tainted by disillusionment.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-50-

-{ 17 }-

The concept of resistance depends upon the illusion of separation.

Separation is
the misdefinition of a form or manifestation as being distinct from oneself and one's causation.
Illusion is
the manifestation of a fraudulent form.
Resistance is
the effort of denying a manifestation.
One resists what one is unwilling to experience.

One works to distance an unwanted experience from oneself.

One resists excessive distance between a desired experience and oneself.

-51-
Demand is
inverted resistance:
resisting the absence of an object of desire, one demands its presence.
Affinity is
a consideration of necessary distance,
which follows a judgment as to one's willingness to experience.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-52-

-{ 18 }-

Resistance attaches attention and perpetuates the object of resistance.

An object of resistance is
any element of experiential reality, to which resistance has become attached, whether directly or indirectly: a soda can, a baseball bat, a shade of blue, the sound of rain falling, a particular odor, etc.

The intent of resistance is to distance and prevent, which assigns concepts of location and time to the object of resistance, and thus requires that attention remain attached to it.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-52-

-{ 19 }-

Subliminal expectation takes precedence over desire.

The intensity of resistance is always greater than the intensity of desire: subliminal expectations are based on resisted and/or unquestioned experience, accrue intensity and certainty from it, and factor into actualization from below the threshhod of consciousness; subliminal expectations are therefore controlling in direct relation to the amount of resistance in the individual's experiential reference base.

Desire, being more of an intellectual phenomenon, is more mutable and open to inspection and considerations of doubt than the more primal or emotionally fixed type of belief expressed as subliminal expectations. Thus where a future manifestation is a variable determined within the conflict between desire and subliminal expectations, the reality defined by the subliminal expectations prevails.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-54-

-{ 20 }-

Autoselection modifies chance.

Chance is
unmonitored random selection operating in a variable environment.
Probability is
autoselection supplying unconsciously specified details for a manifestation within a restricted environment.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-53-

-{ 21 }-

"Negative" conditions are unknowingly and automatically self-inflicted.

Because attention is attached by resistance,
because attention is the creative catalyst,
and because experiential objects of resistance underlie subliminal expectation,
one's ongoing unknowing reference to objects of resistance supports conditional autoselection.

Autoselection occurs unknowingly because the individual is denying the underlying experiential reference base in its original context and ongoing.

Because subliminal expectation takes precedence over desire, autoselection operates to actualize negative conditions "in preference to" any desired objective.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-54-

-{ 22 }-

The fruit of resistance is lost integrity.

Integrity is
wholeness and purity.
Ethics is
decision-process in support of integrity.
Principles are
underlying motivating forces.
Bifurcation is
unintentional secondary individuation,
caused by resisting the abandonment of either selection from a set of choices.

(Latin; furca, a 2-pronged fork)
Mulfurcation is
the shattering of self-referenced consciousness among multiple perspectives,
caused by a dispersal of attention into an array of options in a highly charged situation.
Resorption is
the cessation of individuation or the reversal of bifurcation or mulfurcation.
Panfurcation is
the function in the eternal moment of the AEther being individuated through all possible perspectives.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-56-

-{ 23 }-

Reluctance manifests as emotional charge and results in a loss of intellectual clarity on the subject to which the charge is associated.

Reluctance is
the state of being in opposition to experiencing the fruits of autoselection.
Emotional charge is
recursive ("it calls itself in") resistance.
Reticulation is
the unconscious identification of objects of resistance with each other solely via contextual similarity and therefore without discernment as to the validity of the associations and consequent definitions so devised.
Reticulations are
unnoticed idea/perception packages which include resistance combined with unexamined emotion, definitions and other ideation.

(Indo-European, rete, net)
A net is 2-dimensional, having width and breadth but being essentially flat;
The retinas, optic nerves and reticular formation in the brain form a 3-dimensional structure, having length, width and breadth;
A reticulation is 4-dimensional in that it also includes time, manifesting in the mind much like an enfolded multi-image holographic motion picture with oneself the central object of action.
Reticulations ensnare legitimate information simply on the basis of context sensitivity, thus removing it from willing conscious access.
Context sensitivity is
the linking of related elements, whether by similarities, by significant differences or by any other type of correlation.
Context sensitivity and reticularity do not depend upon rational or even defensible systems of correlation.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-58-

-{ 24 }-

Reticulations form the contextual basis of impulsion.

Impulsion is
unnoticed self-generated driving force.
Autoselection, driven by the intensity of the resistance content of reticulations, manifests from impulsion and actualizes reticular ideation.
Insanity is
the condition of operating in terms of reticular ideation.
(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-58-

-{ 25 }-

The individual is more willing to endure undesirable conditions than to confront reticular "memory".

Memories and precognitions are
misdefined actualizations autoselected by reticular attachment across dimensions to "past / future" events.
Space-Time is
an illusory construct imposed to mask the concurrent multidimensionality of AEthereal reality. (cf. Fund.#6)
Reticular memory manifests as the individual remaining a continuing although resistive participant in contextually similar reticularly autoselected events, for as long as the individual's attention remains attached to the underlying objects of resistance.

A reticular memory is multiply charged in that, in addition to being in truth the actual undesirable event being perpetually autoselected and continually resisted by the individual, it is also overlaid with the "original" incident's resistance value and considerations of avoidance, as well as the resistance and avoidance involved in all contextually associated events.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-61-

-{ 26 }-

The task of the Practitioner is to direct the Petitioner's conscious attention onto the Petitioner's objects of unaware attention.

A Petitioner is
an individual who has recognized the probable availability of effective assistance, and requested it.
Autoselection ceases as the Petitioner discovers the underlying objects of resistance and reticular ideation.
The Condition Assessment is
a directed questioning technique structured to assist the Petitioner to dismantle reticulation.
The Practitioner's sole objective in delivering the Condition Assessment is the dissolution of reticulations.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index)

-60-

-{ 27 }-

The resolution of unwanted conditions is accomplished through unconditional acceptance.

Unconditional acceptance is achieved through recognition of truth.

A full examination and acceptance of the circumstances of an object of resistance results in:
the termination or reduction of ongoing resistance to those circumstances;
the freeing of the attached attention;
the immediate termination of the conditions stemming from autoselective manifestation;
the recovery of a relevant degree of awareness and "self";
and the rehabilitation of a measure of the creative impulse.

(Fundamentals subject listing) - (Index) - (table of contents)

-63-

Selected Axioms

-{ 1 }-

All manifestations occur pursuant to fundamentals.

-{ 2 }-

A clear understanding of the fundamentals involved in any situation is both essential to and instrumental in resolving or changing that situation.

-{ 3 }-

The terminology of a proposition sets the preliminary context for its discussion.

Corollary 3.1:
Nomenclature is both definitive and exclusive.

-{ 4 }-

The terminology of a question determines the terminology of its answers.

Corollary 4.1:
An answer that does not conform to the terminology of its question is a non-sequitur ("it does not follow").
Corollary 4.2:
Except for certain non-sequitur, the value and applicability of an answer are directly proportionate to the quality of the question.
Corollary 4.3:
A precise question prescribes a precise answer.
Corollary 4.4:
A precise question renders vague answers and non-sequitur obvious and unacceptable.
Corollary 4.5:
A vague question renders improbable a precise answer, and invites non-sequitur.

-{ 5 }-

The answer to a question occurs at the moment of comprehending the question.

Corollary 5.1:
No answer is forthcoming prior to comprehension.
Corollary 5.2:
The first question comprehended from a compound question (the question of the first part) is the question that gets answered.
Corollary 5.3:
The remainder of a compound question, which follows the first comprehensible question therein, operates as an interruption to the answering of the already-comprehended question of the first part.

-{ 6 }-

A clear statement of a problem describes its solution.

(table of contents)

-65-

Credo

  1. Willingly experience life.
  2. Appreciate each manifestation for what it is.
  3. Be aware of your causation in things.
  4. Identify the fundamental involved and respond accordingly.
  5. Be affirmative in your imagings, statements and actions.
  6. Appropriately support and cooperate with aesthetic creators with whom you share alignment.
  7. Present an honest representation of the true degree of your understanding.
  8. Present an admirable example in all things.
  9. Seek and maintain clarity.
  10. Communicate.
-66- Always be moved by and toward the highest ethical standard you can imagine. Employ the definitions in Fundamentals 13 and 22 to assist yourself in your pursuit of right action.

Some principles for your contemplation:

You are the AEther, manifesting as an individual. Individuated and possibly alienated as well, but you are it and it is you nonetheless. Thus you are the direct recipient of every effect you create, every action you take, and every thought you hold.

Repeat daily:

The point of power in my life is in the present moment and it is me.

(table of contents)

-67-

Acceptance Services Center

Acceptance Services Center (ASC) is our support organization for publications, counsel, training and promotion. ASC is organized as a Religious Trust, but while ASC is an "establishment of religion" per the First Amendment to the US Constitution, the Doctrine of Acceptance itself is a personal spiritual approach to life and not an organized religion.

There is no dogma in Acceptance, no standard rituals, and only a few ceremonies.

The Mission of ASC:

-68- ASC's Expected Situation:

The Prime Directive:

This directive is enforced by a strict non-indoctrination policy, which appears at the front of all ASC and ASC-mission publications, by order of the Speaker.

Our goal is to provide coordination and education through a network of regional Centers and informal local groups. The Centers will be limited to providing only those services needed to facilitate the use and personal application of Acceptance by local groups and individuals.

Thus, even though we recognize the need for a certain level of organization, we will constantly strive to reduce that need however possible. Two avenues of our approach to this are to use the Internet to openly publish all of the Acceptance materials to the electronic world, and to eventually provide on-line and printed self-study guides that local groups and individuals can use on their own to "go the full distance" without outside involvement.

In this way we hope to restrain the organization primarily to administrative support and research and development functions. This will be the major thrust of our campaign to render impossible the chance that ASC might become just another totalitarian monolith that oppresses its own parishioners.

Of course, this also means that Acceptance adherents will be left to build their own local groups. And, if they choose to take the home-study route rather than go to a Center for training, this means they will bear the burden of their own success in training and personal enhancement.

It also means that they will be as free from interference as they choose to be, since ASC does not assume the power to dictate, condemn, or approve of anyone's personal behavior. All we can do, all we wish to do, is offer the tools necessary for spiritual self-improvement.

Then again, none of this means that one can't come to a Center and train in all of the material to become a Practitioner or even a Minister. After all, no marriages will be possible without Ministers!

Finally, ASC does not have prices or fees. Membership is by subscription and services by a Center are by petition and donation. The amount and frequency of individual subscription are set by the individuals themselves, on an honor system based on the idea that one should always try where possible to give in balance with what one receives.

Donations for services are offered by the parishioner in a petition, which will normally be granted if the offering does not lead to bankruptcy. Of course, non-subscribers cannot be considered parishioners, and therefore petitions for services may only be granted to subscribers.

It's easy enough to subscribe that this should not be a problem for most. For the other few, appeals will be considered.

Some people may find much of this to be a radical departure from their ideas about religion and religious organizations. However, there is not, nor can there be, any "official" description of a religion, church or congregation. True, there are historical precedents, but there are also historical deviations, large and small.

In the United States of America at least, the First Amendment bars government from making rules describing what is or is not a religion, or a church. It is true that the IRS can impose financial use and bookkeeping rules on non-profit organizations, but only those who have asked for non-profit status, and those who incorporate, for each of these actions grants the government jurisdiction it does not otherwise have.

Acceptance Services Center has chosen to remain within the near-absolute protection of the First Amendment and has therefore not asked the government for permission to exist, relying instead upon the right of individuals to freely associate, to communicate, to exercise religion freely without interference from anyone, and to contract (trusts are formed by contract, a constitutionally guaranteed right in the USA). Your relationship with ASC, such as it is or may be, will be by the contract of your word as given in your offerings and petitions, and, subject to their acceptance or rejection as submitted, nothing more.

Finally, we have also chosen to forego the trick of inducing donations by offering tax advantages. We prefer to carry our own weight and take what is offered honestly in a spirit of complete forthrightness. This means that contributions to ASC are not classified as tax-deductible under 501-c-3. It also means that whether or not donors may deduct such contributions is between them and their tax agencies.

We have asked for nothing from government, and so have given up no freedoms of religion or rights to privacy.

As stated, our objective is to provide a better understanding. It is not for us to force that upon anyone, or to unfairly withhold it from anyone. Nor are these things within the rightful powers of anyone or anything else.

(table of contents)

-69-

The Author

Speaker Allen is a self-educated Manifestational Chaos Theorist and metaphysician who has dedicated his life to the applications of his science to improving the human condition. He is the primary developer of the doctrine of Acceptance and the founder of Acceptance Services Center.

Allen is Speaker for Acceptance. His work is to articulate and present Acceptance to those who seek its benefits, and to serve as ASC's representative to the world.

He is also the developer and Sr. Partner of Articulate Management(TM), a visionary new respect-based business management method and management consultancy, headquartered in Mountain View, California.

(table of contents)

-71-

Index

Acceptance . . . . . 8, 9, 11-14, 21, 29-33, 34, 60, 66-69, 73
actualization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-43, 45
affinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
affirmative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45, 65
appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
attention. . . . . . . . 19, 21, 38, 41, 43, 52, 53, 55, 59-61
autoselection. . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 53, 54, 56, 58, 61
aware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34, 35, 38, 65
awareness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35, 39, 60
Axioms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
AEther . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 34-37, 40, 41, 55, 66
AEthereal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 39, 59
altitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
attitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
bad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
bifurcation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
boredom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
catalyst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41, 53
causation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50, 65
chance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Chaos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8, 23-25, 29, 30, 42, 69
charge, emotional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
clarity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56, 65
concession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Condition Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53, 58, 60
configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
consciousness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 29, 34, 39, 41, 55
context sensitivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 40, 42
creativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 42, 66
Deism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
deselection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
desire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11, 13, 51, 52
desire, object of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
destiny. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
destruction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
dimension. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34, 42
Directive, Prime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
discernment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35, 56
disillusionment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48, 49
dispersal  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
dissonance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15, 44, 47
distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 50-52
emotion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47, 56
environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4, 7, 40, 54
ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
evolution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
expectation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52, 53
form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-27, 40, 41, 50, 57, 58, 60
Franklin, Ben. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
frustration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 5, 11-14, 21, 33, 63, 66
good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
gratified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
happiness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
harmony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 47
here-and-now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 36
holographic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 26, 57
Holographic Paradigm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
idea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-26, 29, 40, 41, 56, 60
idealism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
ideation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32, 34, 40, 56, 58, 61
illusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24, 25, 38, 42, 50
impulsion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
individual . 29, 37-40, 44, 46, 47, 52, 53, 58, 59, 61, 66, 69
individuation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36, 55
integrity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54, 66
intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30, 38
intensity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20, 40, 52, 58
intention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 48
intention, blunted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
insanity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
intuition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
journey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
karma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
life, purpose of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34, 52
manifestation. . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 40-43, 50, 54, 60, 65
manifestation, cycle of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
memory, reticular. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
metaphor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35, 44, 47, 48
mulfurcation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
multidimensionality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
natural law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
negative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
net. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
objective, practitioner's. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
opinions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
pain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17, 46
panfurcation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
paradigm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 39, 48
Paradigm, Prime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 48
paranormal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35, 56
persona  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
personality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
perspective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27, 31, 34, 36, 37, 39
petitioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
pleasure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
possibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
practitioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21, 61
preference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
precognitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Prime Directive  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
probabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
probability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25, 54
progression, logical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
purpose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36, 39, 49
purpose, failed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
question, magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
question, of the first part. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
question, virtual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
questioning, directed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
randomness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 44, 46
realities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
recursive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
reference base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52, 53
rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
reluctance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
reselection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-21, 50, 52-54, 56, 58-61
resistance, object of. . . .17, 19, 21, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 61
resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
resolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
resonance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44, 47
resorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
rete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
reticulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56, 57, 61
reticulations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-58, 61
selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42-43, 45, 53-55
self . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36, 38, 39, 48, 53, 55, 58, 60
self-inflicted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
separation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
significance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12, 33
space. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
space-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 44-47
subliminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
talent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25, 28, 34, 52, 57, 59
trauma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
truth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31, 33, 36, 59, 60, 66
unconscious. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
unpredictability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
unwilling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 50
upset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
viewpoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
violated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
volition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39, 48
want . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 12, 52
Washington, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Ylem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
(table of contents)
 
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